Amy Schumer, I still love you, but I didn’t love your movie.
Marley McMillan

Amy Schumer, I still love you, but I didn’t love your movie.

Actress Amy Schumer attends the world premiere of "Trainwreck" at Alice Tully Hall on Tuesday, July 14, 2015, in New York. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP)

Actress Amy Schumer attends the world premiere of “Trainwreck” at Alice Tully Hall on Tuesday, July 14, 2015, in New York. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP)

I finally saw “Trainwreck” last night, and I have to say that I was bummed to like it less than I thought I would.

As a fan of Schumer’s, and female-driven comedies in general, I had been awaiting this film for a long time.

I was disappointed for two reasons.

First, the movie was too much of a traditional rom-com, which was the opposite of what I expected from Schumer.

The movie begins as expected, with Schumer playing Amy Townsend, a hot mess who drinks a lot and sleeps with a lot of guys. (I will say, as much as the character might be expected of Schumer, it is still shocking to see on the big screen, because this type of female character is so under-represented.)

The problem is the reason the movie gives for Townsend’s behavior: that she is “broken.”

Guys sleep with women all the time and they are not seen as “broken,” and neither should women. I know a lot of women who have slept with a lot of guys because, guess what? They wanted to sleep with a lot of guys. And they weren’t quibbling, teary-eyed messes the day after, either.

Given the basic guidelines of the plot, it would have been more realistic to show Bill Hader’s character, Aaron Connors, falling in love with Townsend warts and all, and that Townsend becomes less rowdy not because Connors wants her to be, but because she does.

I practically screamed in the theater when she gave all of her booze away to a homeless man on the street. That’s perfectly good booze! You’re entering a relationship, girl! Not a convent!

My second criticism would be that Schumer didn’t know who she wanted her character to be in this movie. Did she want Townsend to satirize common female behavior? Did she want her to be funny? Did she want her to just be herself, Schumer, circa 10 years ago?

She wavered between all of these personifications throughout the film, making Townsend’s personality and intentions confusing.

Overall, I give the movie a B.

It is worth seeing, because it’s funny and there are still some really surprising things to see from female characters in this film. That said, unfortunately, for the most part, it’s just another rom-com.

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Marley

hosts the “You Get A Rose” podcast covering “The Bachelor” and “The Bachelorette” TV franchises.

| Email | @marleybigelow

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